Sales Tax Holidays
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Sales Tax Holidays

Posted on Friday, August 5th, 2011 at 4:12 pm
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Tis’ the season … for sales tax holidays! That’s right, throughout August and September is when the bulk of sales tax holidays happen. Sales tax holidays are specified dates when sales tax is either reduced or eliminated on certain products up to a certain dollar amount. For example, during August and September lots of people are getting ready for back to school so sales tax holidays will eliminate tax on back to school supplies and clothes. Don’t miss this opportunity to do your back to school shopping and save. Here’s the state by state run down of sales tax holidays:

  • Alabama: August 5-7 save on clothing ($100), computers ($750), school supplies ($50), and books ($30).
  • Arkansas: August 6-7 save on clothing and school supplies ($100).
  • Connecticut: August 21-27 save on clothing and footwear ($300).
  • Florida: August 12-14 save on school supplies ($15), books, and clothing ($75).
  • Iowa: August 5-6 save on clothing ($100).
  • Louisiana: August 5-6 save on all tangible personal property, except cars and meals ($2,500). September 2-4 save on firearms, ammunition, and hunting supplies. May 28-29 save on hurricane preparedness items ($1,500).
  • Maryland: August 14-20 save on clothing and footwear ($100). February 19-21 save on energy star labeled products.
  • Massachusetts: August 13-14 save on all tangible personal property ($2,500).
  • Mississippi: July 29-30 save on all clothing and footwear ($100).
  • Missouri: August 5-7 save on clothing ($100), computers ($3,500), and school supplies ($50). April 19-25 save on all energy star labeled products ($1,500).
  • New Mexico: August 5-7 save on clothing ($100), computers ($1,000), and school supplies ($15).
  • North Carolina: August 5-7 save on clothing ($100), school supplies ($100), instructional material ($300), computers ($3,500), sports equipment ($50), and other computer supplies/software ($250).
  • Oklahoma: August 5-7 save on clothing ($100).
  • South Carolina: August 5-7 save on clothing, school supplies, computers, computer software, some linens, and more.
  • Tennessee: August 5-7 save on clothing ($100), school supplies ($100), and computers ($1,500).
  • Texas: August 19-21 save on clothing, backpacks, and school supplies ($100). May 28-30 save on energy star labeled products and air conditioners ($6,000).
  • Virginia: August 5-7 save on clothing ($100) and school supplies ($20). October 7-10 save on energy star labeled appliances ($2,500). May 25-31 save on hurricane preparedness items ($60) and generators ($1,000).

 

If you are in Alaska, Delaware, Montana, New Hampshire, or Oregon you probably already know that you’re already sales tax-free year round (with a few specific exemptions). Pennsylvania always has no sales tax on clothing. Otherwise, if your state isn’t on the list, hang in there. Sales tax holidays are growing in popularity and have been expanding across the country. Hopefully you will see your state on the list soon!

 

 

 

 

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Good Tip: Saving money is important – especially if you have a lot of expenses like bills to pay, loans to pay off, and all the other things that drain your bank account. Figuring out a way to save money can feel tedious to some, and like a punishment to others. U.S. News suggests that you try one of these money saving challenges. The “No Eating Out for a Month” Challenge This one is self-explanatory. The goal is to avoid eating out for an entire month. This might be super easy for people who enjoy making meals at home. People who really enjoy dining out, or ordering food to be sent to their home, may struggle with this one. It’s worth a try because spending money on take-out is more expensive than buying groceries. The Pantry Challenge This one is a variation of the “No Eating Out for a Month” challenge. The goal is to use up all of your groceries before you buy more. It forces you to try and remember why you bought a food or beverage that you don’t know what to do with, and gives you the opportunity to find a way to use it. The one exemption to this challenge is the foods that have expired. Don’t eat them! Throw them in the trash. The “No Spend” Challenge Make a goal to avoid spending money during an entire weekend. The only exemption in this challenge is that you are allowed to pay bills. This challenge is interesting because it requires creativity. You must be creative and find workarounds for problems that you would typically solve by spending money. You may have a different outlook on spending after finishing this challenge.